Grammar! Part Two

Welcome to Part II of our grammar blog series! Continuing from last time, I’ll go over a few more questions from my #nerdy grammar survey.

The first question of Part II covers homophones. In case you need a refresher, a homophone is a word that’s pronounced the same way as another word, but has a different meaning, and often spelling. I can still hear the sing-songy voice of my second grade teacher as we repeated after her, “I sound the same, but I don’t mean the same!”

Homophones are easily missed by spellcheck and autocorrect, so check out THIS LINK of often-mistaken homophones from Grammarly’s blog (yes, grammar blogs are a very real thing), and keep them in your brain for next time you write.

 

QUESTION 3

Select the sentence you think is correct:

[icon name=”circle-thin” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] They’re going to love going there — I heard their food is the best!

[icon name=”circle-thin” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Their going to love going there — I heard they’re food is the best!

[icon name=”circle-thin” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] There going to love going they’re — I heard their food is the best!

SURVEY SAYS:

A – 100%! Amazing. All correct.

PRO TIP: 

“They’re” = they are (a contraction)

“There” = refers to a place (over there; I love it there), OR used with a “to be” verb (there is, there are, etc.)

“Their” = indicates possession (their dog…the dog that belongs to them)

 

QUESTION 4

Fill in the blank: Rats! We should ______ gone to that game!

[icon name=”circle-thin” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] of

[icon name=”circle-thin” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] have

[icon name=”circle-thin” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] if

SURVEY SAYS:

B – 100%! All correct again…so proud.

PRO TIP: If you can’t remember, just think should/would contractions…should’ve = should have, would’ve = would have.

 

QUESTION 5

Select the sentence you think is correct:

[icon name=”circle-thin” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] If you’d like to attend the dinner, please let Bob or myself know.

[icon name=”circle-thin” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] If you’d like to attend the dinner, please let myself or Bob know.

[icon name=”circle-thin” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] If you’d like to attend the dinner, please let Bob or me know.

[icon name=”circle-thin” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] If you’d like to attend the dinner, please let I or Bob know.

SURVEY SAYS:

A – 41%

B – 14%

C – 43%

D – 2%

ANSWER: C!

PRO TIP: Think of it this way: eliminate the whole sentence, including Bob, except the “let ____ know” part. Which fits? Let myself know? No. Let me know? Yes. “Myself” should generally be used in conjunction with I. (I bought myself a dog. I didn’t want to wait, so I did it myself.) And remember…always put the other person before yourself!

 

That’s it for Part II! Stay tuned for Part III, guaranteed more grammar goodness!

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